Bible oddities

Not too much time to post today, so I’ll leave you to ponder one of the many strange inexplicable stories from the Bible. This come from the book of Mark, chapter 14. Judas has just betrayed Jesus to a multitude sent by the chief priests, elders, and those totally bad-ass scribes. Jesus says basically, “Dude, you guys saw me everyday and could have taken me anytime. Why this way? Can’t we all just get along?”. O.K., he didn’t say the last part, but mentions something about the “scriptures need to be fulfilled”, although which ones exactly he doesn’t say. This does beg the question, if they knew who he was, as Jesus implies, why did they need Judas to identify him? I guess we need a plot device to heighten the drama. Immediately after this, we have verse 51 (my Revised Standard Version).

And a young man followed him with nothing but a linen cloth about his body; and they seized him, but he left the linen cloth and ran away naked.

Ooookay. Until now, I don’t think we have ever heard about this young linen-clothed man, and we never hear about the young man, now sans linen cloth, again. So, there’s a story in there somewhere, just waiting for somebody to bring it to life.

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2 Responses to “Bible oddities”

  1. ebccrosswalk Says:

    I’ve heard people say that in ancient times it wasn’t Mark, the author of the Gospel of Mark. I forget all the ways they came to that conclusion, but the main one I remember is that ancient writers would often include cryptic details that would frequently mean “this was me” without actually coming out and saying that because it was considered improper to reference yourself in your writing.

  2. William Robinson Says:

    The most common interpretation is that of the poster above: It was the author of Mark, and in that era Gospel stories were written without mentioning the author. Another is that it was the Apostle John, who apparently looked young-almost childlike

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